The importance of feeling good

Print Friendly

Seems like a no-brainer, right?  Feeling good is it’s own reward.  This is true and obvious, so why do we all do so many things that don’t feel good?  The short answer is that we have convinced ourselves that we must.  We “have to” work at that crummy, low-paid job which isn’t even fun and the managers don’t appreciate what unique and valuable things we have to offer.  We “have to” get up all night long to feed that baby, and then spend all day cooking, cleaning and taking care of the other rug rats.  We “have to” chop that wood, bale that hay, can those vegetables.

“Whoa!”, you say, “Of course I have to do those things!  We’d never survive if we didn’t!”  I am not taking exception to things needing to get done in life, just the perspective of “having to”.  It strikes me as a fundamental need for people to have a sense of freedom (why else do we all want lots of money?) and if you look at the things you do all day as being required of you, rather than chosen by you, your sense of freedom is diminished.  (see “Choices”)

We may not have control over what happens in our lives, but we have always got the choice of how we choose to see and feel about them.  The steering wheel in my car had been shaking for a week or so, and I thought about checking it out to see what it meant.  Then yesterday my husband had a flat tire when he got up to go to work.  He changed the tire, but on his way home, the lug nuts must have worked loose and the wheel fell off while he was driving.  He was fine, but the truck needed a lot of repair.  This was a reminder to me to get on with seeing to my car, which as it turned out had a belt separation and according to the mechanic could have blown out at any time, but soon for sure.

Since I brought my car to the same shop as my husband had, the mechanic commiserated with me about so much car repair expense.  Then he said, “The thing that worries me, you know, is they say that bad things always come in threes…” .  “The trick,” I replied, laughing, “is to see it as a good thing!”  My husband had kept the car under control and escaped injury, I was chivvied into getting my car fixed, which saved the stress of a blowout as well as the cost of towing!  I counted all that as  four good things, minimum.

It is all about perspective.  Everything that happens can be construed as good or bad, depending on how you view it.  Even things that are almost universally considered bad have good aspects.  The Holocaust and the Twin Towers attack, which are  horrifying and fearful examples of  ‘Man’s inhumanity to Man’  have caused people the world over to look around with new eyes at the global community and what makes it work, to hold their loved ones close and remember to appreciate them, to be grateful for the good things life has to offer us, individually as well as world wide.

Okay then, the importance of feeling good.  I want to juxtapose the Law of Attraction and mainstream “reasons” for feeling good, mostly to save me a whole ‘nother post, as this is the only LoA thing I want to say in this context.  The LoA teachings posit that what you are thinking/feeling now is what you are attracting to yourself for the future.  Obviously then, if you want good-feeling things to come to you, you find a way to feel good now (or as good as you can, as soon as you can), no matter what is happening.

The more mainstream reasons to maintain feeling good are, firstly, that it feels good.  Duh. Secondly, when you feel good, you get inspired ideas for dealing with things.  This does not happen when you are depressed or angry or frightened.  You may think of solutions to problems at those times but they are depressed or angry or frightened solutions.  Thirdly, when you feel good you get where you want to go so much more easily.   Hard work feels less ‘workish” and more productive,  problems are challenges to surmount, you are more willing to exult in your progress, etc.  Doing your tasks without feeling good about it feels like pushing against yourself, slogging, increasingly difficult, and in the end- not good enough.  And certainly not worth the effort.

You know it’s true. You want to always do the things you want to do, and feel good while you’re doing them.  So if you want to make a living, take care of the children and keep the farm, you can choose to feel good about the ways you have chosen to do that.  Until you make another choice, that is…

 

 

About laurie

I am a work in progress and well aware of it. More to the point, excited about it! Being a work in progress means I can change at any time. I can be someone today that I wasn't yesterday, and might not be tomorrow, but is perfectly suited to today. Every day. That is complete freedom.
Tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The importance of feeling good

  1. kathy swanson says:

    always appreciate your insight! thanks for the perspective reminder. am actually doing really well at feeling good!

Leave a Reply to kathy swanson Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>